04 July 2009

Happy Independence Day

24 comments:

Pam Walter said...

This would be a great movie to watch every year at this time. It would remind us of the bravery and sacrifice made by so many to establish this wonderful country. www.satisfiedsole.com

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

That was the purpose of the post Pam. Thanks.

Johann Van De Leeuw said...

Happy Independence Day! We celebrated with a Spud Gun and Amish bombs. What y'all do Mr. Williams?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Johann:

My wife and youngest daughter have started a baking business, so I helped them with a sale until late afternoon. Then, my wife and I, along with some of our children and grandchildren made the annual pilgrimage to Virginia Military Institute for their celebration. It was a great day!

Jubilo said...

Dear Old Dom.,
"The Patriot" is as close to history as Kevin the Carpetbagger is to being a Southron.
cordially,
David Corbett

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

As you probably know, the story is based loosely on the life of Francis Marion, aka "The Swamp Fox."

The nasty Brit also is based on some historical figure, but I don't recall his name. Anyway, its a great flick and, as with most "historical" films, mixes truth with fiction.

I still love the ambush scene!!

KL is the Great Northern Knight come to save us poor dumb Southerners from ourselves. I've seen it all before.

;o)

Michael Lynch said...

The villain in the movie is quite loosely based on Banastre Tarleton.

--ML

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Michael.

Bill Vallante said...

As Michael Lynch said, the villain is based on Banastre Tarleton, who did massacre colonial troops at Waxhaw Creek. To my knowledge however, he did not lock a bunch of civilians in a church and burn them alive, as was portrayed in the movie. The movie is a feel-good movie, quite entertaining and quite overdone. Mr. Corbett's analogy is a very good one I think. And yes, Mr. Richards, re: KL, you hit the nail on the head. Though I do hold associate memberships in several SCV camps, I have no family ties to the WBTS and I have lived my entire adult life in the North. One thing I have never seen in my nearly 60 years is this - a busload of Southerners coming up to NY city trying to tell Northerners how to behave or what to believe in, or how to think or how to live their lives. Sadly,in my nearly 60 years, I have seen far too much of the reverse.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Hello Michael. I agree, quite entertaining and overdone. But I like it.

Best,
RW

Kevin said...

Hi Richard,

It's funny how my name constantly comes up in your comments section. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the attention, but do you really believe that what we are doing is so different? You said:

"KL is the Great Northern Knight come to save us poor dumb Southerners from ourselves. I've seen it all before."

Is this just another "tongue-in-cheek" comment or do you really believe that this is my intention? The two of us are passionate about the history of the Civil War, we've published in various places, and we both have big enough egos to think that people will be interested in reading our thoughts on a daily basis.

We both argue vigorously for our preferred interpretations of the past and on occasion we take little jabs at one another. It seems to me that your evaluation of my motives tells us much more about you than it does anything about me.

Finally, I hope you are enjoying this amazing summer weather. I can't remember a more pleasant one.

"Wild Bill"

I hope you too are enjoying your summer "behind enemy lines." Don't worry as I am enjoying this Virginia summer immensely and no doubt I feel closer to Robert E. Lee than you ever will in the land of Hilary Clinton. Enjoy buddy.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Hello Kevin. A casual stroll through your posts and comments will reveal my name comes up there quite often as well.

Somewhat tongue in cheek Kevin, but all humor must contain at least an element of truth to be funny. Frankly, Northerners who spend much of their energies lecturing on the sins of the South is nothing new. The opposite, while it does happen, it not near as common. Native Southerners are more likely to mind their own business than many of our yankee friends. (Don't forget, my paternal side of the family hails from New England - so I'm double-qualified to make that observation.) ;o)

"We both argue vigorously for our preferred interpretations of the past and on occasion we take little jabs at one another."

No disagreement there. Though my jabs, despite what you may think, are not directed at you personally, just your ideas and comments. Watch for a rather vigorous one soon regarding some of the recent homeschooling comments on your blog.

". . . tells us much more about you than it does anything about me."

You overuse that statement. Just some constructive criticism.

And yes, I am enjoying the very pleasant summer weather. I trust you are as well. We've been getting very nice rains over here in the Valley, everything is nice and green, the gardens are doing great and we've not had (yet) that crushing humidity that is so common this time of year. Last night my family and I went to Gypsy Hill Park and enjoyed listening to the Stonewall Brigade Band. They are great and provide a wonderful service to the community.

If you've never taken the opportunity to hear them, you should do so. Monday nights, 8 pm and its free.

Best,
RGW

Kevin said...

Richard,

I've never been to Gypsy Hill Park so thanks for pointing it out. My wife and I have been meaning to spend an evening in Staunton for one of their jazz evenings. I think they've done some great work in restoring the downtown area.

I just want to point out one thing and that is that I do not "lecture on the sins of the South." Like many others I am very much interested in the history of the American South, but I do not see myself as engaging in some kind of moral crusade.

Yes, I thought some of the comments on homeschooling might lead to a response of some kind. As I stated, my experience with homeschooled children is quite limited. It kind of got away from the point of the post.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Kevin:

I'm not much of a jazz fan, but I believe that is offered on Thursday nights. Bluegrass is on Wednesdays - while I'm in church and then the big band offering on Mondays - something for everyone.

Yes, Staunton has done a superb job at preserving their historic buildings.

Bill Vallante said...

Ah Kevin! It shouldn't be too much of a surprise that your name comes up freqently, here as well as in other places. You glibly poke fun at things that are close to the heart of some people, especially those whom you've chosen to live among, you file it under "scholarship", and then you yelp that you're abused and "targeted." No matter, I hope you are enjoying your summer as well - in Virginia. I just wish I could say that the real Virginians were enjoying your stay there as much as you are - but I can't.

Anonymous said...

A few points:

"we both have big enough egos to think that people will be interested in reading our thoughts on a daily basis."

Have Levin ever considered that people read his spiteful and pedantic commentary only because he gets history so wrong? It is an honor to refute such misinformation regarding the South, but also it is so easy to weary oneself on the misguided.


"You overuse that statement. Just some constructive criticism."

Not only is Levin's failure to face criticism squarely a re-occurring issue, but his misuse of "than" in place of "then" is ridiculous for someone who has published anything, good or bad.

"I do not "lecture on the sins of the South." "

Simply go to any random month of Levin's blog to find over half of the posts containing anti-southern views. His villianization of our soldier ancestors and culture is markedly loud and obnoxious. Can we expect anything different from a transplant with no deep historical ties with this country?

Kevin said...

I apologize for all my shortcomings, including my inability to get the than/then distinction right.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Apology accepted Kevin. I have the same problem with affect/effect.

Anonymous said...

I'm just saying McPherson wouldn't get than/then wrong, and who wouldn't strive to approach that level of unequaled perfection?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

McPherson might get it wrong since he's been distracted lately with attempts to prevent the honoring of the Confederate dead.

Kevin said...

Anonymous,

I take full responsibility for my grammatical errors and yet you choose to comment anonymously. How telling.

Anonymous said...

Nice parry Kevin. I'll be more than glad to disclose my identity if you think it would enhance the issues at hand.

The grammatical errors are a non-issue for me. Rather, it is the slant of your content that is of concern. Would you be interested in listening to the "other side" regarding your views?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Kevin, Anon:

I sincerely appreciate both of you commenting here, but as this is becoming a back and forth between you two, it might be more appropriate to take the discussion to KL's blog or to private emails.

Best,
RGW

Kevin said...

Thanks for the offer Richard, but I think I will pass. :)