17 December 2009

Zinn & Chavez - Soulmates


"We want it all. We want a peaceful world. We want an egalitarian world. We don't want war. We don't want capitalism." ~ Howard Zinn


“our revolution seeks to help all people…socialism, the other ghost that is probably wandering around this room, that’s the way to save the planet, capitalism is the road to hell....let’s fight against capitalism and make it obey us.” ~ Hugo Chavez

He won a standing ovation from those listening to his speech.


More here.

8 comments:

Corey Meyer said...

Richard,

Due to your love of capitalism...and I am not saying that I don't...what is your feelings on shipping US capitalistic jobs overseas? If American capitalism is so great, why not keep those jobs here...other than cost of labor?

Johann Van De Leeuw said...

Golly, talk about knuckleheads.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Corey:

Excellent question. Neither China nor Mexico (just to pick 2 where many of the jobs have gone) have the burdensome regulations that we have i.e., OSHA, the EPA, Work Comp and insurance requirements, workplace rules, etc, ect. - not to mention the parasitic trial lawyers. Those burdens are not a fault or flaw of capitalism, but of an over-reaching government. That's not to say SOME regulation and oversight isn't necessary, but the extent of such regulations in the American economy is a ball and chain around the ankles, no necks, of many American businesses.

I believe the American worker can compete head to head, despite wage issues, with any worker in the world, but adding the nanny-state imposed weights on American businesses is something that is impossible, in many cases, to overcome.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Corey:

You're "not saying that you don't" - love capitalism, does that mean that "you do" love capitalism or do you favor socialism?

Corey said...

Of course, I prefer capitalism over socialism. I believe that many of the things that have made us a nanny state have been in place for a reason...big business cannot regulate itself. But I also believe government has gone too far in some respects as well. We need to find a balance and neither party right now is willing to do that.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

I have great faith in the marketplace, which is simply people making choices based on self-interest. The market can regulate big business if the government whores in Congress would quit selling legislation. It is primarily the government's responsibility to enforce contracts between parties.

"We need to find a balance and neither party right now is willing to do that."

I would tend to agree with that. If there is a total collapse, which is certainly a possibility, either free market principles will be our guiding way out or an even heavier handed government will offer "solutions" - which will be more of the same programs that caused the problems to begin with.

Arthur B. Breedlove said...

Corey:

What you fail to realize is that "capitalism" itself is not the problem, but rather the collusion and merging of corporate interests with central political power in Washington.A feature that has been a part of the American landscape at least since the late 19th century. It is the political patronage of powerful interests that have caused most of the problems; not the alleged free market we have today. Hamilton and Lincoln were both proponents of economic centralization in the hands of the few. It is commonly regarded as "crony capitalism." This of course had much to do with the tensions between sections in the decades leading up to the WBTS. The current political parties are no antidote either, as they are too busy seeking patronage from said special interests.

Judging from your earlier questions(albeit rhetorical ones) concerning the reasons the South seceded and your blog;it is apparent you prefer to see everything from within the narrow myopia of race. In truth, slavery and secession where separate questions. I do agree however that we need to find a balance, but find it unlikely to occur within the current framework of the two party duopoly in Washington. The ideas of states-rights were intended to act as a check against such a monopoly of power. Sadly, the federal government has become the sole arbiter as to the extent of its own power.

Lawrence Underwood said...

Another aspect to a properly functioning capitalistic economy that is often overlooked, as it is in most discussions of the ills of society, is that regardless of the system put in place it will also end up bad if men's hearts and desires are not constrained by an internal control. Without either a regenerate populace or a populace that respects the Laws of Nature's God there is no hope for a truly free people.