05 January 2010

The Five Happiest States - Most In The South


"Except for Hawaii -- presumably blissful for its island breezes, yearlong flora, and an prevalent pineapples -- all of the top five happiness states are located in the South or desert Southwest. In fact, of the happiest fifteen states, all but Hawaii and Maine are traditionally "red" states. As for the bottom fifteen, all but Missouri and Nevada are located within the coastal blue-state culture. . . New York has the distinction of being the least happy state in the country."

Hmmm . . . what does this tell us about American society and culture? What does it reflect about some of the issues surrounding our history, the WBTS, and so-called "Lost Cause" mythology. Is there a connection? I'm just asking the question.

". . . a spirit of "community colonization and control" . . .  -- what today might be termed communalism or collectivism -- originated with the settlement of New England and spread to the "northern plateau" of New York, Michigan, and Wisconsin. A very different culture of individualism dominated the southern colonies and advanced with the frontier throughout the Southern, Western, and lower Midwestern regions. "The spirit of individual colonization, resentful of control" . . . , characterized this vast heartland region."

Question - is this why so many more folks leave the North and come South - are they searching for happiness as in, "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?" Do they find the utopian philosophies which dominate the "unhappy" states aren't so utopian after all? Then why, pray tell, do they immediately set upon trying to implement them in their new homes?

"It is that kind of unhappiness that the political Left is attempting to force on those of us who still believe in liberty, and who, for the moment at least, are still happy.

You can read some interesting and thought provoking analysis on a recent study here at The American Thinker.


10 comments:

Corey said...

Maybe Ignorance is really bliss!

Chaps said...

Tell me Corey, you should know.

Richard, how long will you allow this arrogant yankee post here?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Chaps:

Oh, I don't know. I'm rather tolerant, though I do have my limits. Corey's comments are typically more self-revealing than anything else. For example, he expressed some curiosity (which I found curious) toward my strong defense of free-market capitalism. Unlike other blogs, I don't discourage spirited (even arrogant) debate here. It keeps me sharp.

;o)

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Chaps:

Just as an aside, I have 2 "yankee" son-in-laws who I love dearly and the Williams side of my ancestry hails from New England. While I am fiercely proud of my Southern heritage-and quick to defend it-there is much to love and admire in the New England spirit of America as well. Remember the Tea Party? Remember Concord? Remember Paul Revere? I am also very proud of my New England heritage and the service my yankee ancestors rendered to our Republic.

I understand your frustration at Corey's condescension, but not all our yankee friends are of the same attitude.

;o)

Best,
RW

Chaps said...

Richard-

The yankees of the Tea Party, Concord Bridge, the early Navy and so on are long gone. They have generally been replaced by multi-cultural, politically correct, government dependent statists. The change started when they raised an army to deny to the Southern States the rights they claimed for themselves 90 years before. On the other hand, there are many folks born in the north who are not yankees.... at least by philosophy. Your sons-in-law, as my wife, probably fall into that category.

Arthur B. Breedlove said...

Mr.Williams:

I would agree with the spirit of your last post. I believe it was Dr. Clyde Wilson who stated that not every northerner is in fact a "yankee." It is usually quite easy for me to spot the difference. Where I live affords me ample practice (much to my chagrin).The cornerstone of a true yankee seems to be the predisposed belief in their own infallibility. However, I can't tell you how many yankees I've meet who have yet to figure out that "Carolina" is in fact TWO states, and has been thus since well before the American Revolution.

"Corey's comments are typically more self-revealing than anything else."

Well spoken sir. Rather than getting exercised about his shallow and sophomoric statements; we should instead be thankful.What better way to demonstrate the transparency of such hollow assertions?

Arthur B. Breedlove said...

Chaps:

I agree with Mr. Williams that there is much to admire in early New England history. However, I also believe that they have become detached from most of it, for all the reasons that you mentioned. I was struggling to put this into words but you have described it succinctly. I had another comment floating around here somewhere...hmm.

jacksonianlawyer said...

No, not every northerner is a "yankee." Some are carpetbaggers.

Kidding aside, I agree with the spirit of your post RW, but also posit (as has been so well-stated above) that much of the north of today has become so far disassociated with its fine heritage as to scarcely be recognizable. It cannot go unnoticed that the outstanding examples you mentioned are all pre-War of Northern Aggression.

Chaps said...

"It is usually quite easy for me to spot the difference. Where I live affords me ample practice (much to my chagrin)."

This is the reason I head my written letters, "Occupied Northern Virginia."

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Anon - no, I didn't miss it. Just didn't want that discussion here.