28 February 2010

MOC Preserves My Ancestors' Rebel Yell

As a member of the Museum of the Confederacy, I receive their email newsletters on a regular basis. In one of the latest ones, there was some news about  fellow SCV member, and President/CEO of the MOC, Waite Rawls, III's work regarding the Museum of the Confederacy's efforts in preserving the sound which sent chills up the spine of many a Union soldier. Regarding the origin of the Rebel Yell, my guess is that it likely originated spontaneously during the heat of a charge, very possibly from the **ancestral spirit of some Scots-Irish plowboy with blood, fear, and anger in his eyes. Part one below:





And now, fellow SCV member and historical artist, Henry Kidd explains further in Part two . . .




As a kid, my friends and I had our own version (not quite as bone-chilling) of the Rebel Yell which we shouted as we explored the woods, streams, and fields where our ancestors had spilled their blood defending their homes. You might also be interested in my previous post on this subject.

**Update: After reading the MOC's quarterly magazine piece (Winter 2010) about this, I discovered they too considered the Scots-Irish connection to the Rebel Yell:

"Some believe it descends from a Scottish war cry said to have been used by the legendary forces of Robert Bruce and William Wallace and brought to America with the tide of Scots-Irish immigrants."

6 comments:

Corey said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzOAbekZoOc

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks for the link Corey. I believe, however, the research of the MOC reveals a more accurate recreation.

MSimons said...

I have heard those recordings they will make your blood run cold.
No wonder green and sometimes harden Union troops broke ranks and ran when they heard this in Battle.

Johann Van De Leeuw said...

Thank you for posting this Sir! Please keep up the good work!
~Johann

Corey Meyer said...

You know, I have listened to the two, as they claim, different recording and I believe they are the same recording...one just happens to be a bit clearer than the other...IMHO. I am not trying to discredit the MOC, but they sound the same. I know they are supposed to, but they sound like two versions of the same recording.

I wish I had a program to run them at the same time and compare the sound signature.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

I thought they sounded very similar as well - who knows? The technology exists to verify, assuming the quality of the recordings is good enough. Maybe they did that, if not, they should just to put aside any doubt.