28 June 2010

SC Leading A Modern "Secession" Movement?


No, not that kind of secession. This kind:

"Could it be that South Carolina is again leading a secession – this time a secession of the main stream of the American people from their establishment political class?" (Source.)

And . . .

"Perhaps nothing better illustrates the historic change brought on in these June elections than the nomination – and all but certain election – of Tim Scott. In the first Congressional District – the very cradle of the Confederacy (a.k.a. the “Fort Sumter” district) – the over 90% white GOP primary runoff voters, elected the black conservative Scott in a 68-32% landslide over the son of South Carolina legend Strom Thurmond who was endorsed by all of the unsuccessful white candidates from the primary including the son of former governor Carroll Campbell. For South Carolina it was truly a “when hell freezes over” moment." (Source.)

7 comments:

Randy Wade said...

It is a sad day when it is big news that somewhere in south carolina a black man is elected in 2010!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"Sad day?" Why would it be a sad day? I think it's great that a conservative of any color gets nominated.

msimons said...

Some Where John C. smiles when he sees that wonderful word Secession!

It is always great to see the Right Man win the office.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Quite an interesting story and turn of events in my mind.

Randy Wade said...

No, again you fail to grasp the events. Sad day because it has taken so long for a black man to obtain this type of freedom. 150 plus years after emancipation.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Randy:

Wrong again. You fail to grasp the facts. Mr. Scott would not be the first black man elected in SC. As a matter of fact, one of the most powerful men in Congress today is an African-American from SC - James E. Clyburn.

Michael Bradley said...

If one will take the effort to check on who holds office one will find there are more African American office holders in the South than in any other section. It should also be noted that Louisiana has an Indian American govenor and a Vietnamese American in its congressional delegation. This is more diversity than is found in most states anywhere in the nation.