05 July 2010

Fox News Does Gettysburg

And my friend Alan Farley has his say . . .

6 comments:

The Warrior said...

I saw this yesterday...

Chaps said...

“For every Southern boy fourteen years old, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it's still not yet two o’clock on that July afternoon in 1863, the brigades are in position behind the rail fence, the guns are laid and ready in the woods and the furled flags are already loosened to break out and Pickett himself with his long oiled ringlets and his hat in one hand probably and his sword in the other looking up the hill waiting for Longstreet to give the word and it's all in the balance, it hasn't happened yet, it hasn't even begun yet, it not only hasn't begun yet but there is still time for it not to begin against that position and those circumstances which made more men than Garnett and Kemper and Armistead and Wilcox look grave yet it's going to begin, we all know that, we have come too far with too much at stake and that moment doesn't need even a fourteen-year-old boy to think This time. Maybe this time with all this much to lose and all this much to gain: Pennsylvania, Maryland, the world, the golden dome of Washington itself to crown with desperate and unbelievable victory the desperate gamble, the cast made two years ago....

William Faulkner, Intruder In The Dust”

msimons said...

That name Gettysburg bings a great amount of saddness to me for what might have been.

The saddest words ever said of mice or men are it might have been.

John Steinbeck

Douglas Hill said...

Chaps, that applies to fifty year-old Southern boys too; I speak from experience. :^,

Good job by Rev. Farley there, as always.

Cavalry charges felt three miles away? Never heard that before; were they all Clydesdale mounted? I can imagine it heard from that distance, and felt at half that. Not an expert on G'burg, I'm open to enlightenment.

13thBama said...

There were some instances of acoustic anomalies during the war. Such as the town closest to the fighting heard nothing, but a town further away claimed it sounded much closer. But I had never heard of the cavalry being felt from so far away. It would certainly prevent them from sneaking up on anyone, wouldn't it? :)

Douglas Hill said...

Yes 13thBama, some of those anomalies are addressed in Volume II of "Battles and Leaders" on page 365, in a piece titled "The Cause Of A Silent Battle", accompanying the subject of the Battle of Gaines Mill. A Mr. R.G.H. Kean observed the battle "for nearly two hours" from a distance of no more than a mile and a half distance at most, but "not a single sound of the battle" was heard by himself nor his companion Gen. G.W. Randolph, then the C.S. Secretary of War, from their locale.

An even greater example also listed was the Battle of Port Royal Sound, where the sound of the naval bombardment could not be heard "no more than two miles" from its source in some directions, yet was heard in St. Augustine, Fl., 150 air line miles away. Chalk it up to meteorological effects; so says the segment.

Cavalry felt at three miles? A good ol' simultaneous south-central Pennsylvania temblor goin' on? Since I wasn't there I can't pooh-pooh the cavalry's hooves entirely. I can accept the idea of it being audible, but I'm afraid I'd have to feel it for myself...