04 April 2011

Poor Governor McDonnell

The guy just can't get a break. First, he gets slammed because his 2010 Confederate History Month proclamation excluded any mention of slavery (though he'd already addressed that tragic part of Virginia's history in his 2010 Black History Month proclamation and though some historians reluctantly admitted its not necessary to mention slavery at every mention of the Confederacy). Then he gets slammed when he later apologizes and issues another "revised" proclamation. Personally, I really didn't have a major problem with either proclamation - though I would have done it a bit differently.

So, this year, it should really come as no surprise that he's not issued anything on the subject - at least not as of the time of this post. But some sociologists playing historians are slamming him for that - which goes to prove that it is only their preferred PC version of history which they believe should be proclaimed.

3 comments:

Andy Hall said...

Richard, this is disengenous. Several of the "sociologists playing historians" who've commented on this are, in fact, professional historians, working in academic, archival and public history venues.

More to the point, their recent comments on this topic have not been about what "should be proclaimed," but asking whether or not Governor McDonnell will follow through on the commitment he made six months ago, very explicitly:

_______________

Next April our office will issue a “Civil War in Virginia” proclamation commemorating the beginning of the Civil War in our state.

This proclamation will encapsulate all of our history. It will remember all Virginians—free and enslaved; Union and Confederate. It will be written for all Virginians.

________________

The question of what the governor "should" say was answered by Bob McDonnell himself. The only question now is whether he has the courage of his convictions, and will follow through.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Good morning Mr. Hall. Thanks for the comment, but I stand by my remarks.

"asking whether or not Governor McDonnell will follow through on the commitment he made six months ago"

Right, but that commitment was to their particular perspective. That perspective is not necessarily wrong, but it is only one of several, as was the original proclamation.

"The only question now is whether he has the courage of his convictions, and will follow through."

Actually, I think the question is which way the Governor thinks the wind is blowing. Governor McDonnell is, first and foremost, a politician and will act, in most cases, in a way which most likely assures him a political future. That is not a criticism (I voted for him), just a fact of life. They all do it - for the most part.

Best,
RGW

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

PS - what's actually disingenuous is the "historians" who, last year, took the governor to task for his original proclamation, while ignoring his black history month proclamation which addressed slavery in Virginia.