16 April 2011

Shenandoah Valley Native Gregg Clemmer Defends


. . . the Boys in Gray with an editorial in yesterday's Baltimore Sun advocating for uniformed Confederate reenactors to participate in a parade. So who's being divisive? Here are a few excerpts:

"We rarely hear of the Army's 29th Division, the aptly named Blue and Gray Division whose members came from Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia — and in particular, the 116th Regiment of that Division who in World War II went ashore in the first wave at Omaha Beach on D-Day, suffering frightful losses (Company A was decimated, with 96 percent casualties). Yet it is the 116th that heralds directly from another command — a Confederate command, Thomas Jonathan Jackson's legendary Stonewall Brigade."

And . . . 

"It is not too late to invite the Boys in Gray to join the Boys in Blue for the Grand Procession up Pratt Street on Saturday. Make your own bit of history, Baltimore. Show the world in this moving, poignant example that America is indeed one, commemorating our tragic past but at the same time demonstrating that despite our differences and diversities, we have indeed 'bound up the nation's wounds.'"

Read the complete piece here.

Historian Gregg Clemmer lives in North Potomac and is the author of two works on the civil war, "Valor in Gray: The Recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor" and "Old Alleghany: The Life and Wars of General Ed Johnson."

3 comments:

Susan Hathaway said...

Great piece. Thanks for sharing.

I saw this post today from someone who attended and found it interesting...
"Regarding the Commemoration in Baltimore: a private ceremony was held the morning of 04/16/11 in front of the former President St. Station (now a Civil War museum), attended by the S.C.V. and Confederate military and civilian reenactors, as... well as by Union military reenactors whose chief officer, Steve Bunker of Maine, began the campaign to save the building back in the 1970s. As Mr. Bunker said, in attempting to save yet one more relic of this country's history, sympathizers of both sides worked together with mutual respect and trust. Soon afterwards, a sudden heavy rain obliged the mayor to cancel the official parade. However, Mr. Bunker's men shouldered arms anyway and proceeded along Pratt Street in the downpour, followed by as many Southern civilians as were available, with the police providing security from the traffic. The parade turned out to be just what it should have been in the first place."

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Great story.

Susan Hathaway said...

Great follow up article by Mr. Clemmer, as well...
http://www.examiner.com/civil-war-heritage-in-washington-dc/one-hundred-fifty-years-later-no-riot-on-pratt-street-this-day