15 July 2011

Somethin' I Saw Today - Post #6

Fresh, cool-running springs dot the landscape all through Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Many of these are well-known, others are not. Throughout history, these springs have greeted many a dry and thirsty traveler along the byways and back roads of Old Virginia. Farmers, Civil War and Revolutionary soldiers, Indians, hitchhikers - all have benefited from these  refreshing watering holes. I came across this one in a very rural part of the Valley on Route 252 on the Augusta/Rockbridge County line. I've passed it many, many times before and often stop, as I did today, for a drink. The water was crystal clear and ice cold. The spring is, in my mind, quite beautiful and peaceful. (Click on images to enlarge.)

11 comments:

Lindsay said...

How cool...I love the thought of how many people throughout history have used something like this. If only I were a tall old oak tree nearby so I could have witnessed it all!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

That spring ran just as bold about 8 years ago when the Valley experienced the worst drought in generations. It's a beauty. It comes out of the side of a ridge, flows into the trough, then overflows and goes under the road into a creek.

Michael Aubrecht said...

AWESOME FIND MY FRIEND and why I love living in VA.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Michael - yes, anyone living in Virginia is most definitely blessed.

13thBama said...

I found it ironic that the google map of the area shows two place names in the vicinity with "spring" in them. Mint Spring and August Springs. Are they a common sight around there Richard?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

13B - Springs are very common, yes. Lots of underground limestone caves and water sources in the Valley and the Blue Ridge - which is why Coors located here. The last time I heard, they were pulling 1 million gallons of water per day out of the Blue Ridge. Mint Spring is actually N/E of the place pictured here. Funny you should mention that one. My grandparents used to own property on which part of Mint Spring was located. Augusta Springs is West of the location pictured here.

Of course, we also have the better known Warm Springs and Hot Springs west of the Valley in the Alleghenies.

13thBama said...

The Scots-Irish (or Scotch-Irish) seem to have an attraction to spring water and limestone. I would bet there have been a number of stills in the region, over the years :)

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

13B - certainly. The abundant water supply was attractive. Also, my Scots-Irish ancestors used the limestone to build homes, barns, and bridges. Stills? Most definitely. As I often say, among my ancestors can be counted moonshiners, preachers, & politicians. I am proud to be associated with two of those categories and am, of course, ashamed of the politicians.

Some of my Coffey ancestors were notorious bootleggers.

Thomas said...

It's wonderful to live in the Alleghenies. I live withing a half mile walking distance of three limestone springs. One has been in the family for over two hundred years.
Great for home brewing too and I never have to worry if there's some kind of disaster and I need a water supply. I don't like mineral springs with iron and sulfur. Gimme the sweetwater!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Thomas - about where do you live?

13thBama said...

Thomas,

I had relatives in Alabama who used a well that stunk horribly of sulfur. It did, however, make the best sweet tea I have ever tasted. Maybe it was the preparer but I have always thought it was the water that made it so good lol