16 December 2011

Thomas Jefferson vs. The Elites


"Bureaucrats hate the quintessential American culture of family farms.  The independence-centered, 'pull yourself up by your boot straps' emphasis on responsibility goes against everything they believe in.  Simply put, people who think for themselves and work hard don't live off the government . . . Farming is part of our identity.  It is our way of life, our heritage, our patriotism, and the foundation of our generational values.  Farming is the essence of our loyalty to our families and our God -- and there is nothing more sacred than that. That's why unelected liberal elites don't want farm kids working on farms." ~ Josiah Cantrall 

More here at the American Thinker.

"Cultivators of the earth are the most valuable citizens. They are the most vigorous, the most independent, the most virtuous and they are tied to their country and wedded to its liberty and interests by the most lasting bands." ~ Thomas Jefferson to John Jay 23 August 1785




5 comments:

Brock Townsend said...

Good piece and posted. I could smell the hay and Orchard Grass of my youth as I watched the video.

Douglas Hill said...

"Those who labour in the soil are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. It is the focus in which he keeps alive that sacred fire, which otherwise might escape from the face of the earth. Corruption in the mass of cultivators is a phaenomenon of which no age nor nation has furnished an example. It is the mark set on those, who not looking up to heaven, to their own soil and industry, as does the husbandman, for their subsistance, depend for it on the casualties and caprice of customers. Dependance begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition. This, the natural progress and consequence of the arts, has sometimes perhaps been retarded by accidental circumstances: but, generally speaking, the proportion which the aggregate of the other classes of citizens bears in any state to that of its husbandmen, is the proportion of its unsound to its healthy parts, and is a good-enough barometer whereby to measure its degree of corruption...
...The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government, as sores do to the strength of the human body. It is the manners and spirit of a people which preserve a republic in vigour. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution." ---Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XIX

Original spelling retained.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Doug. That's the one I was actually looking for. I should have consulted my copy of "Notes" instead of Google. ;o)

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Brock. Nothing quite like the smell of fresh cut hay.

Douglas Hill said...

You're welcome; keep them "Notes" handy!;^)