30 March 2012

A Visit To Augusta Military Academy

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to stop into the museum at the old Augusta Military Academy located on the Valley Turnpike (Lee-Jackson Highway, Route 11) here in Augusta County. It was an absolutely beautiful spring day here in the Shenandoah Valley. Below are some photos I took. If you're ever in the area, I'd highly recommend a visit.
"Soon after the Civil War ended in 1865, Confederate veteran Charles S. Roller began teaching at the Old Stone Church nearby at Ft. Defiance. By 1874 he had founded Augusta Male Academy and incorporated military discipline into its classical curriculum by 1880. Roller renamed it Augusta Military Academy in 1890; it was the first military preparatory school in Virginia. In 1919, the Academy was among the first schools in America to adopt a Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program. The Academy’s international reputation for excellence in secondary level military education attracted more than 7,000 students from the United States and abroad before it closed in 1984."



Enfield Model 1858 Musket

Old AMA Barracks

The Museum



Brass from every military school in the Old Dominion. Virginia has, as does much of the South, a long tradition of military prep schools. Our oldest son graduated from Fishburne Military School in Waynesboro, Virginia.

And right up Lee-Jackson Highway from AMA . . .

"Here stood, from the early 19th century until the mid-1900s, the tavern and stagecoach stop first owned by Peter Hanger. In 1848 its second proprietor, Samuel Harnsbarger, planted a willow tree in a spring here, across the newly-constructed Valley Turnpike from the tollhouse. Spring water flowed up the trunk and out a spout driven in its side, falling unto a wooden trough. For more than a century, three successive “willow spouts” provided water for thirsty travelers, horses, and automobiles."


Though the sign says not safe for drinking, I've done so on numerous occasions. So far, so good. ;o)

13 comments:

Brock Townsend said...

Thanks. You should enjoy this.

http://www.namsouth.com/viewtopic.php?t=2147&highlight=greenbrier

Brock Townsend said...

There is no way to subscribe to this post.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Brock! I'll check it out.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You need a link . . . ???

http://oldvirginiablog.blogspot.com/2012/03/visit-to-augusta-military-academy.html

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

I assume you went to school there?

Brock Townsend said...

Yes, did you know about the coatees before?
========
I was referring to the fact that there is no place to subscribe to your threads, so that I will get email notification of a comment.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Yes. Blogger is not the best blog tool, but its easy to use. There may be a way to subscribe to threads. I'll check and post if I find anything.

Douglas Hill said...

I need to get by there, it's been a while. Years ago I donated the jacket that just makes in into the left edge of your first and sixth images (and a hat that didn't); 1920's vintage. From Augusta to Tampa (where the cadet eventually ended up), and back again.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

That's interesting - I didn't know that. Yes, they have some pretty cool items on display.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

BTW Doug, the dug relics are from the Battle of Piedmont.

Douglas Hill said...

Great to hear, thanks! All the more reason to visit soon.

Wendy Armentrout said...

To Douglas Hill.... I see you had donated a jacket to AMA. I have found an old AMA Jacket ,hat and pin. I am trying to find the date that the jacket may have been from. It is very old wool Gray in color hat is blue. We found it in an old family trunk in a trash bag and would love to get some history on it. I am looking at having it preserved and put in a case. Any info from anyone as to find the date on this would help. I can send photos if needed. Thanks.
Wendy Armentrout Please email me legenbass@msn.com

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Wendy - have you tried contacting the AMA museum? http://www.amaalumni.org/museum/

That would be your best shot at getting the information you're seeking.

Best,
RGW