16 May 2013

The True Meaning Of The First Amendment

4 comments:

ropelight said...

Professor Eastman could have strengthened his presentation by including a description of the financial burdens imposed on all citizens by an Established Religion.

No matter what religion an individual citizen might adhere to, he would be taxed to support the Established Religion.

The concept of religious freedom itself would have been nothing but the shadow of an unfulfilled promise if an established church had retained the ability to impose taxes on non-members for the support of its preachers and property.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Hello Rope - as a descendant of Roger Williams, I would concur. However, the 1st amendment specifically limited "Congress", not the states. In their wisdom, the Founders left those issue to be hashed out on the local level though, again, I would agree.

ropelight said...

Yes, the Bill of Rights imposed restrictions on Congress, but subsequent SCOTUS decisions introduced the Doctrine of Incorporation so the States were also similarly constrained.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"but subsequent SCOTUS decisions introduced the Doctrine of Incorporation so the States were also similarly constrained."

True, but that does not necessarily mean that was the Founders' intent. There is a method for addressing shortfalls and changing society in the Constitution - the amendment process.