07 June 2013

It Worked For West Virginia . . .

Several Colorado counties that strongly oppose increased regulation of the oil and gas industry say they want to form their own state. They are planning on calling it North Colorado or Northern Colorado.
Story here. Speaking of West Virginia - It might not be a bad idea for southwest Virginia and western Virginia to leave Virgina and join West Virginia and leave much of the the rest of the state to it's own follies. Why not?

8 comments:

Ralph Steel said...

Yes it worked for West Virginia because the government in Virginia was not legitimate. However, Colorado has a legitimate democratically elected government.

Seems like a big difference to me.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"the government in Virginia was not legitimate."

The never-ending debate.

Robert Moore said...

No, no... I prefer to learn from the example that is Berkeley County, including its I-81 road improvement project that seems to have been ongoing for the last ten years (if not more). Best to remain with Virginia... and roads are just one of the differences I know of.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Well, for commerce and purely utilitarian purposes, you are correct Robert. Personally, I don't care for interstates. I much prefer the individual personalities and "closeness" of our old 2 lanes.

And, from a cultural and geographic perspective, there were reasons my a(our) ancestors chose the hills of the Blue Ridge and the peaceful woodlands and meadows of the great Shenandoah. For me, those reasons are still valid and WVA seems more like home than does much of what lies east of Richmond.

Thanks for the comment!

Robert Moore said...

It's interesting to note... before the secession crisis of '60-'61, western Virginians (and I'm not just talking about the counties of what we now know as "West Virginia", but also in the Valley... right here) were not at all happy with legislation being passed by... eastern Virginians. Something about... taxes. There were differences in the two sections of the state... then, and today. Geography was part of it then, and, as it frames a mindset, might still contribute to it today.

Robert Moore said...

... and to be clear, I'm not putting-down West Virginia. When able, I spend a great deal of time in Jefferson County... AND I even stomp the grounds around "old Berkeley" as well.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"There were differences in the two sections of the state... then, and today. Geography was part of it then, and, as it frames a mindset, might still contribute to it today."

Oh definitely. The Blue Ridge still serves, despite technology, as a type of "barrier" to certain things. Thank God for it.

ropelight said...

As long as we're busting up the Old Dominion, the Tidewater region of Southeastern Virginia has always had more in common with NE North Carolina than with the rest of the State.

This wouldn't be the first time the idea of such a political realignment surfaced, several times with a good bit of momentum behind it.