21 September 2013

Pound Sand

Don't you just love those who have absolutely no ancestral connection to Civil War soldiers patronizing those who do by telling us how we should remember and commemorate their bravery and sacrifice?

My response: Go away.

Addendum: This effort to "help us with our memory" also often comes from those who have made no effort to hide their anti-*Confederate bias. Quite frankly, I'm not interested in your advice on how I should, or should not, remember and commemorate my ancestors' service.

*While I was thinking particularly of my Confederate ancestors when I posted this, the same could apply to those with Union ancestors. 

9 comments:

Ralph Steel said...

Who is doing this?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Oh, come on Ralph.

Ralph Steel said...

Sorry, I just did not want to assume. Sounds like you have some very opinionated thoughts on this subject.

I wont bother reading your lightly read blog any more in the future.

I tend to believe the war does not just belong to those who had ancestors in it.

But you go and live in your little confederate world all you want.

Ralph.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"I tend to believe the war does not just belong to those who had ancestors in it."

I tend to believe the same thing. That's a rather obvious straw man Ralph. BTW, my ancestral roots run almost as deep in New England as they do in Virginia. Not all my ancestors were Confederates.

Robert Moore said...

I agree that the American Civil War is there for all to embrace, if they so choose. One can certainly feel "something", even if they didn't have an ancestor in the fight. Bob Krick is one example.

Yet, there are those who feel what might be deemed as an even stronger connection, because of ancestry... and why shouldn't they? In fact, even if it is in their "own minds", with that ancestral connection there is (can be)... I think... an even stronger desire to understand the history that surrounded the ancestors.

It might be that I'm biased, but I think having people on both sides of the fence (and on the fence) helps me as I strive for balance in my understanding of the Civil War... and my people in it.

Robert Moore said...

*"Biased" in that I think there is validity in my position... not that I am necessarily biased toward one side or the other... or toward the middle. Having realized the dynamics of my (mostly Southern... though not necessarily Confederate) ancestry, I feel that taking sides among them and leaving the others out... is bad practice... and just not polite. Call it a matter of respecting one's elders. :)

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You nailed it with those two comments Robert. I agree completely. Though all Americans can "have a connection" to the WBTS, there is an additional dimension/perspective those like you and I can add unlike others. I don't think its any coincidence that Robertson and Freeman wrote the definitive biographies of Lee and Jackson (respectively) and that Robertson and Freeman were Virginians who served in the Confederate Army. I am addressing this connection in the foreword to my next book. Thanks for the comments.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Hat tip to Brooks Simpson for pointing out this error in my previous comment:

"I don't think its any coincidence that Robertson and Freeman wrote the definitive biographies of Lee and Jackson (respectively) and that Robertson and Freeman were Virginians who served in the Confederate Army."

No, neither Freeman nor Robertson fought for the Confederacy. That should read:

"and that Robertson and Freeman were Virginians who had ancestors who served in the Confederate Army."

Glad to know Professor Simpson is reading my blog again. There's hope for everyone. I wonder if he'll allow Kevin Levin to start reading here again and responding on his blog.

Of course, those familiar with some exchanges here know Simpson has made a few mistakes himself.