08 March 2014

The Work Continues . . .

On the Battle of Waynesboro book . . .


I'm trying to determine the precise terminus locations of Jubal Early's right and left flanks, and place them in a modern context. I think I've come close. Early's left flank was in the air, which is one of the reasons (besides the overwhelming odds) it was such a rout. Google Earth is a wonderful and amazing tool for such research.

6 comments:

ropelight said...

Precision is going to be a tough nut to crack. Short of digging a test pit perpendicular to Early's known defensive line, locating a characteristic trench discontinuity in the stratification (likely rich in artifacts), and following the line at reasonable intervals till it peters out, I can't think of a way to precisely identify either terminus. Although ground penetrating radar might be worth a shot, I just don't know enough about it to say one way or the other.

An old friend, a geophysicist, is up to speed on the latest ground penetrating imaging technology, I'll find out what he thinks.

Otherwise, is precision really necessary, won't a reasonably informed approximation do? Just Askin'

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"Precise" was an over statement. "As close as possible" would be more like it. Early's left flank ended about, as best I can tell, 50 yards or so from where my grandmother's home stands today. There is still some evidence of a trench in one area.

13thBama said...

I once saw on television a reconstruction of Custer's last stand, based on metal detector use. Lines of battle could be determined by the "drops". Also, don't overlook county GIS web sites. I am looking for a home in South Carolina and those are available in almost every county.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

A friend of mine told me that most historians have the some of the lines at Port Republic wrong. He can prove it from the relics he's found there in lines. MD's are excellent tools.

Mike Nuckols said...

Interesting research. I've always wondered about the battle of Waynesboro as so little has been definitively written about it.

Thanks much!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Mike.