26 October 2014

Life In Rural Virginia

Living in Western Virginia is a blessing. Most of those blessings are simple, unassuming pleasures - like walking down the sidewalk on Main Street in your local town and seeing this:


6 comments:

ropelight said...

I can't make out the others but that's a longhorn in the foreground, and a nice looking house on the hill. My mind's eye sees a big barn and corrals with a few frisky quarterhorses out back.

Thanks for the memories.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You are correct Sir! And the family that owns that land goes back to the 18th century in the community.

E.J. D'Agrosa said...

Reminds me of when I lived in NJ. Just 20 min. from where I lived there was a park with an actual working farm that kept the practices of colonial days and shunned machinery. They weren't Amish though.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

EJ: We have something like that in Staunton - The Frontier Culture Museum.

Anonymous said...

How much of Waynesboro is rural now, and how much of the corporate city limits do you suppose was rural during the war? The reason I am asking is because somebody 'way back when' lived and died in "Waynesboro," yet they had a farm, according to family records. Do you know which side of town was the most rural?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Anon - this image was taken in "Downtown" Stuarts Draft. During the war, W'boro was still a town and, like many towns in America in those days, cows and other livestock often roamed the dirt streets. The population was less than 500, so the whole area was still very much rural. I don't think any particular side was more so than the other.