21 January 2015

Happy Birthday General Jackson

The Professor from Virginia by Mort Kunstler

6 comments:

ropelight said...

Initially, it was a bit of a shock to see Stonewall Jackson in a blue uniform, but it only took a moment's reflection to recall that he was a relatively unheralded commissioned officer in the US Army for a good many years before he achieved undying fame and the respect of friends and foes alike wearing the Confederate grey of his native Virginia.

May the great man rest in well deserved peace secure in the knowledge that the true Sons of Liberty, honorable men, brave and faithful, will never forget his glittering accomplishments, nor will his bravery and his integrity be sullied by bigoted fools and self-serving historical revisionists who refuse to see beyond their own petty intellectual and moral limitations.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Well said sir.

Ralph Steel said...

Just curious, how can men who fought for slavery be the true sons of liberty that ropelight calls them?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Because that was not the only reason they were fighting and not a reason at all that some of them were fighting.

"Often misunderstood are Jackson’s feelings about slavery. He owned two slaves, both of whom had asked him to purchase them after the deaths of their masters. Anna
Morrison brought three slaves to the marriage. Jackson viewed human bondage with typical simplicity. God had established slavery for reasons man could not and should not challenge. A good Christian had the twin responsibilities of treating slaves with paternal
affection and introducing them to the promises of God as found in holy scripture. Toward that end, Jackson taught a Sunday afternoon Bible class for all slaves and
freedmen in Lexington." - Dr. James I. Robertson, Jr.

There were other causes, (as with all wars), that were involved. We're not going to debate that again here. Pointless. Please refer to the Must Reads tab for a more detailed discussion on that topic.

ropelight said...

Mr Steel, reference to the true Sons of Liberty runs both forward and back. Honorable men of today and tomorrow as well as those of the past do not fear to recognize and respect great men.

Just as water seeks its own level, men of unbecoming character seek to deny greatness by belittling accomplishments they can't
approach.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

RL - yes, all sons have fathers.