31 March 2015

Top 50 Reasons Why We Love The South

Well, many of us anyway. We know who the haters are. Some of my favorites:

Nº 06
WE EMBRACE THE PAST

“My favorite thing about the South is that it never turns its back on its mistakes. Our history has some seriously rough edges but we don't file them down or sand them smooth. We live with them and move on. And that flavors every single aspect of Southern life.”—Alton Brown, Georgia-based author and Food Network star
Nº 28
HUNTING AND FISHING ARE ART FORMS

“The South smells of red cedar and red dirt...She tastes of Gulf shrimp and coarse-ground grits. She sounds like shot shells at a Saturday dove shoot and is seen through live oak boughs draped with Spanish moss. The South moves slowly enough to be known.”—Flip Pallot, Florida fly fisherman TV host
Nº 33
WE PRESERVE MORE THAN JUST HOUSES

From Maryland to Georgia, tobacco barns are woven through centuries of Southern history. (John Wilkes Booth spent his last hours trapped in one near Bowling Green, Virginia.) Now, a preservation movement is growing to salvage these barns, often built of hand-hewn logs, from the ravages of time, neglect, and development. One laudable effort is Preservation Virginia’s Tobacco Barn Preservation Project, which records priceless oral histories from farmers and doles out small grants to preserve and repair the barns—thousands of which remain standing in Southside Virginia and North Carolina alone. preservationvirginia.org
Nº 38
HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS

“My roots are Gulf Coast and, of course, I think it is the best region of the South. But I’m sure it would only take a millisecond for readers to respond to that piece of bragging and tell me that I am a swamp rat from a shipyard town, and whatever piece of turf they call home is a far better version of the South than mine.”—Jimmy Buffett, singer-songwriter and entrepreneur
Nº 44
WE HAVE THE BEST STORYTELLERS

From African folk to Appalachian tall, the South is home to a long tradition of storytelling. Today, a new kind of spoken-word culture flourishes here: true-life tales shared by amateurs. Each month, in venues across central North Carolina, a group called the Monti invites everyday people to divulge something harrowing, funny, heartwarming, frivolous, or, ideally, all of the above. Scientist turned storyteller Jeff Polish launched the organization in 2008; since then, a lineup ranging from the late Elizabeth Edwards and Chapel Hill mayor Mark Kleinschmidt to the authors Clyde Edgerton and Jill McCorkle has taken part. “I want it to be as if the tellers are living the experiences onstage,” Polish says. “The more authentic and sincere, the more connection with audiences.” themonti.org
Go here to Garden & Gun (of course I'm a subscriber - think of the publication as Southern Living with an attitude) and pick your favorites. As the tag line says, "Some may call it bragging. We call it counting our blessings." Yeah, I've done that before.

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