19 May 2015

We Are the Elite & Deserve Preferential Treatment

Ruling class elites are a frequent target of criticism here - particularly those in academia who want everyone to believe they are imminently more qualified on certain topics - not for what they've accomplished, but just because they have a degree. They demand to be treated differently. For lack of a better term, they are faux intellectual supremacists. They are the modern American aristocrats, at least in spirit. (No, not ALL academics, but enough to be noticeable.) This air of supremacy among ruling class elites is epidemic in modern America. I'm sure it's always been there throughout our history; to one degree or another. But it seems to be more rampant among academics, politicians and the media. Here's the latest example:
On Dec. 23, 2012, former NBC anchor David Gregory hosted an interview with National Rifle Association Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre on “Meet the Press.”

As expected, the interview was hostile, with Gregory repeatedly badgering LaPierre over his not supporting a federal high-capacity magazine ban. But instead of simply talking about 30-round magazines, Gregory brought one on set to wave in front of the cameras. The problem? The “Meet the Press” studio is located in Washington, D.C., where merely possessing an empty high-capacity magazine is illegal. . . .

The punishment for possession of a high-capacity magazine is up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. NBC had apparently contacted the police to ask for special permission to use the magazine on air, and the request was denied. Gregory used it anyway and got a free pass on the consequences for doing so. 


To give some perspective, D.C. businessman Mark Witaschek had a single empty shotgun shell from a bird hunt, a spent brass casing and muzzleloader reloading supplies, which are considered ammunition under the law, in his Georgetown home when it was raided by dozens of police officers. Witaschek was prosecuted by D.C. Attorney General Irvin B. Nathan in a lengthy, two-year-long process and convicted. Nathan refused to prosecute Gregory.
How does that make you feel? More here from The Hill.

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