04 November 2015

First African American Elected to Statewide Office in Kentucky's History


And she's a Tea Party activist and a Christian. Oh my. An interesting story, no doubt . . .
Hampton says her guiding light is constitutionally limited government, and she told Bailey that when trying to climb out of inner-city Detroit, she felt government and friends and family around her were rooting for her to fail . . . Black conservatives in the state told Bailey that Hampton "humanizes" a GOP that has seemed distant to African Americans. Rick Howland, a conservative radio show host in Louisville had this to say about her:
"We know Democrats ain't doing nothing for us and we're afraid of Republicans, and all of a sudden here's a woman standing in who isn't afraid of them. Are there racists in the room with her? Sure, but there are racists in the Democrat room, too."
More here.

14 comments:

Ralph Steel said...

That's really sad. Not that she is a member of the Tea Party or that she is conservative or that she is black...but that it has taken Kentucky so long to do this. It really highlights the failure of the state more than it highlights the good of her election.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You're right, it is sad. Those liberal Democrats have controlled the Governor's mansion for decades. It took a conservative, Tea Party Republican to finally break the stranglehold of the racist Democrats.

Thanks Ralph. Your perspective always brings light to a topic.

Ralph Steel said...

How does controlling the Governor's mansion have anything to do with who the people elect for statewide office. There are always a mixture of Dems and Republicans in the statehouse. The previous governor was a Republican as is the newly elected one

It would seem that regardless of Dem or Rep. blacks are not welcome in government in Kentucky. Sad, seeing that its 150 years after the War of the Rebellion.

Glad to see your ugly partisan head rearing.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"How does controlling the Governor's mansion have anything to do with who the people elect for statewide office."

Since the control of the GM is decided by voters, I'd say it has quite a bit to do with it. But the post was not about the Statehouse, it was about the executive branch.

"It would seem that regardless of Dem or Rep. blacks are not welcome in government in Kentucky."

It would seem that Ms. Hampton's election blows your opinion out of the water. She will now be well positioned to run for Governor, should she so choose at some point in the future.

"Sad, seeing that its 150 years after the War of the Rebellion."

So her election is, in your eyes, "sad"? I think that her election is wonderful. The election was by almost 10 points - pretty close to a landslide.

"Glad to see your ugly partisan head rearing."

LOL!

Ralph Steel said...

No, its great that she got elected regardless of her party...it is sad for the state it took this long.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

And, as I said, it took a conservative, Tea Party Republican to do it.

ropelight said...

RGW, it might be useful to remind Ralph that Kentucky was a border-state during the War Against Southern Independence and was considered by Abraham Lincoln as the key to Northern victory. If Kentucky joined the Confederacy Lincoln feared the Union was lost.

Lincoln wrote to Orville Browning (September 1861):

"I think to lose Kentucky is nearly the same as to lose the whole game. Kentucky gone, we cannot hold Missouri, nor Maryland. These all against us, and the job on our hands is too large for us. We would as well consent to separation at once, including the surrender of this capitol."

(Both Lincoln and his wife were born in Kentucky)

Initially, at the outbreak of hostilities, Kentucky was officially neutral but after a botched attempt by Southern sympathizers to join the Confederacy, the state legislature petitioned the Federal government for military assistance, which was quickly rendered. For the duration of the War Kentucky remained solidly Union.

The prejudice on display here is Ralph's alone.



Ralph Steel said...

So she is the only black person to run for office...Dem or Rep...in the last 150 years?

Ralph said...

Rope,

Kentucky's government may have remained Union and it may have sent more men to the Union Army but ever since the war Kentucky has identified as southern.

There is no prejudice from me!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Read the headline.

Ralph Steel said...

It says first Elected, but that does not mean the first to run.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You're very observant.

ropelight said...

Prejudice consists of holding preconceived notions about individuals or group that are largely inaccurate and highly resistant to revision especially in the face of contradictory information.