04 March 2016

Will Virginia Protect Its War Memorials?

I had the honor of working with Terry Heder who works for the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation last year in leading a tour on the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Waynesboro, as well as developing a self-guided driving tour of that battle, soon to be published by the SVBF. Below, Terry comments on a bill awaiting the governor's signature which will prevent localities from damaging or removing war monuments, including any related to the Civil War.

9 comments:

Eddie said...

Being that the Senate vote was divided entirely on the party line, I am not very optimistic about the governor's signature

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

BTW, it's quite interesting to witness all the big government advocates suddenly get religion on this one topic and advocate for local control in opposing this bill. And they think no one sees threw their conversion of convenience. Frauds.

jessie sanford said...

Richard
I was thinking the same thing, Levin, and his followers are quick to defend centralized big government when it suits their interest as you stated. Hypocritical Frauds!!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Well, it's a lot of others as well. And a fair rebuttal from that viewpoint is to suggest that those who favor more local control are just as hypocritical in now opposing it. However, I believe these monuments transcend local vs. state laws, in similar ways that a National or State park does. These monuments belong, in many ways, to more folks than just local citizens.

I don't want the county where Mount Rushmore is located deciding, for whatever reason, that those monuments are inappropriate and should be sand-blasted. Not a perfect analogy, but I think it makes my point.

jessie sanford said...

Your point is very clear and as much I detest the Lincoln memorial on the mall in Washington I would not in any way want to see it removed.
But maybe some signage could be placed to explain how he was a racist and tyrant who went to war to ensure slavery would forever be the law of the land in the United States.
Kinda of dumb statement right? But no different than what many left-leaning historians are advocating for our Southern memorials.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

The whole "contextualizing" point of view is condescending in my view, as if the American public is too stupid to already understand the times and complexities of these monuments. It's rather elitist and silly.

Eddie said...

Just what I expected from the carpetbagger governor --

https://governor.virginia.gov/newsroom/newsarticle?articleId=14561

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Well of course. No surprise.