29 April 2016

Stonewall Jackson: "God Was Unhappy With the South"

8 comments:

Jeffrey Mathews said...

My Very Dear Sir and Countryman: I have never considered Thomas Jackson overmuch during my life. My family trooped in the Louisiana Cavalry Regiments in the Army of Northern Virginia so Marse Robert and to a lesser extent, Jeb Stuart were always my focus.

I should very much like to thank you for posting this as it shows how uninformed I have been about this good Southerner and this godly man. You may be sure that as time and circumstances permit me, I shall take a new interest in finding out out more about General Jackson and taking some comfort in my old age in finding a renewed sense of the Creator and His plan for me in so doing. As a Catholic I should very much like to have been a fly on the wall when Lt. Jackson spoke with the good Father at the Cathedral in Mexico City. Our Louisiana Regiments were of course, well provided with Roman Catholic Priests during the WBTS and who were by all accounts diligent in the discharge of their spiritual responsibilities.

Again my most sincere expressions of gratitude in taking the time to post this and indeed for your generosity in keeping this Blog up and going. It has so very often been a source of aid and comfort to me over the years.

As my niece is graduating Harvard in May, I know I shall need all the accumulated wisdom of our ancestors to withstand the inevitable assault on my "antediluvian" values as I attempt to remind her that other people do not necessarily long to be told what to do and think and act by her and her minions simply because she has gone up North.

Thank you again.

Jeffrey Mathews

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

You're welcome sir.

Anita L. Henderson said...

Jackson while at VMI, observed that there was no church for the free and enslaved black population of Lexington. He took it upon himself to set up a Sunday school for the black population as he felt everyone should know God. Along with local pastors he set up a Sunday school on Sunday afternoon in spite of incredible verbal, legal and written opposition from elements of the general population. There were even some death threats but Jackson persevered on as once he had an idea in his head, he did not abandon it. So the Sunday school was established and he started to run this school. Unlike his white neighbors, he was always courteous to his black students in private as well as public, going as far as doffing his hat in public to the ladies. He continued to inquire of the welfare of the Sunday school while fighting as his pastor supporters ran the school. He also continued to get monetary sustenance as well which was greatly appreciated by the congregation. After the war, the school survived and established a larger church in Roanoke where there is a stained glass portrait of General Jackson in the worship area.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Thanks Doc.

Kennan Seaman said...

Hmmmm, there are some people in Charlottesville who would do well and learn something by watching this!

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

I don't believe "learning" is the objective.

Kennan Seaman said...

Sadly you are right Richard. I think appeasement is a better word. SMDH.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

I would characterize it as willful and/or cowardly ignorance. Most modern historians will be judged poorly by future historians and by posterity.