25 August 2016

Homeschooling: When Will The "Experts" Concede They've Lost the Argument?

 Homeschooling, Westmoreland Homesteads, Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, 1936
Business Insider:
Recent data collected by the Department of Education reveals homeschooling has grown by 61.8% over the last 10 years to the point where two million kids — 4% of the total youth population — now learn from the comfort of their own home.
Contrary to the belief that homeschooling produces anti-social outcasts, the truth is that some of the most high-achieving, well-adjusted students are poring over math problems at their kitchen table, not a desk in a classroom. According to leading pedagogical research, at-home instruction may just be the most relevant, responsible, and effective way to educate children in the 21st century.
Yes; and contrary to the control freaks in much of the public (and some private) education business. I understand their fear - besides the elitist notion that "we know best", paid educators are also concerned about protecting their turf. That's a natural reaction, but not one that has the *best interests of the child at heart.

And BI gets this right as well:
The biggest stereotype surrounding homeschooling is that constant one-on-one teaching deprives kids of the socialization they need to thrive. Not so. Homeschooled kids are just as likely to play soccer and do group projects as any other students.
We've had that discussion here before

Click here to read the BI piece.

And another recent piece points out that African-American families are increasingly joining the homeschooling movement as well. African-American public school teacher turned homeschooling Mom Nikita Bush, was recently quoted in the Christian Science Monitor as saying:
“people are starting to realize that public education in America was designed for the masses of poor, and its intent has been to trap poor people into being workers and servants. If you don’t want that for your children, then you look for something else,” she says. To her, the biggest flaw in public education is a lack of character education, an "absence of a moral binding," that contributes to low expectations – and lower outcomes for children of color.
The CSM piece adds:
The reasons black parents cite for home-schooling their children cover a wide range. Some sound similar to the  homeschooling movement as a whole: religious beliefs, a desire to shelter children from an increasingly crass or materialistic society, a conviction that they are best-suited to teach their kids the values they need to live a fulfilling life.
You can read the interesting CSM piece here.

I will add that we are currently in the infant stages of a similar movement when it comes to college education as well - and for many of the same reasons. What many have referred to as the democratization of education is making much of this possible. Technology has reshaped how we learn much more than some realize. Regardless, the dinosaurs in academia and government schools who continue to advocate a centralized, top-down approach to education will stubbornly fight on to protect their turf. They are fighting for their own relevance.


But the genie is out of the bottle. Parents are taking back control of the education of their children from the "experts." The failure of the bloated education industry, with its misdirected priorities, will be the reason for its own demise. 

*As always, I acknowledge that there are dedicated teachers in public and private education that do have the best interests of their students at heart. Those teachers have my appreciation and prayers. But that does not change the facts of the education establishment and its failures in general.

7 comments:

Ralph Steel said...

Again I will make the statement that teachers are the only professionals who are not treated as such.

Richard, do you do your own electrical or plumbing work around the house?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"Richard, do you do your own electrical or plumbing work around the house?"

How providential that you should ask Ralph! As a matter of fact, I do! I just finished replacing the shower fixtures in one of our bathrooms. This involved replumbing as well. No problem!

I believe God gave parents all the tools they need to teach their children. Society puts up road blocks. I appreciate the efforts of good teachers - I had several growing up. But my wife and I did a better job than anyone else could have.

Proof's in the puddin' partner. Homeschooling stats are the puddin'. The facts and stats are irrefutable.

Ralph Steel said...

Odd isn't that plumbers, electricians and teachers have to be licensed by the state to practice their craft yet any old mom or dad and teach their kid math, science and history without a license or any real formal training. Heck, a HS dropout could homeschool their child no questions asked.

So just curious, what do you say to parents who cannot afford to have one parent stay home and teach while the other works? Most families I know cannot afford only one working adult.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"any old mom or dad and teach their kid math, science and history without a license or any real formal training. Heck, a HS dropout could homeschool their child no questions asked."

"Formal training" does not guarantee competence. Go back and read the post. The fact homeschooling is so successful and students run rings around both public and private school students is irrefutable evidence that you are either ignorant of the facts or choose to ignore them.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

"So just curious, what do you say to parents who cannot afford to have one parent stay home and teach while the other works? Most families I know cannot afford only one working adult."

Here's what I say: In many (not all) cases it's all about priorities. In my own case, I worked at 3 jobs so my wife could stay home and teach our children. My son works 80 hours a week for the same reason. My son in law works 60-80 hours a week for the same reason. My other son in law does jobs on the side for the same reason.

We also chose to live a very frugal lifestyle as well. No cable TV, rarely ate out, etc.

Bottom line, it can be done with sacrifice in most cases. Again, it's all about priorities.

Ralph Steel said...

No, formal training does not prove competence, that is what administrators take care of in the school building. Today, with major changes to the laws, schools are able to get rid of teachers who are not competent easier then ever before.

You said nearly 2 million children are being homeschooled now. Out of the 57.6 million kids of school age in this nation, I think if I did my math right, it comes out to be about .03% of kids are homeschooled in this country.

So one parent stays home to teach while the other works so much they are never home to see those children they are homeschooling. Sort of an odd trade off don't you think?

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Ralph - No, it's now nearer to 4 million, maybe over. That info was from 2012. If you'll click on the "data" link, you'll go to the DoE site with all the numbers, which explains the 4% figure that was quoted.

"So one parent stays home to teach while the other works so much they are never home to see those children they are homeschooling. Sort of an odd trade off don't you think?"

Not really. I along with the fathers I know making this kind of commitment were/are still able to spend ample amounts of quality time w/our children. I was self-employed and often took my children along with me to work, as does my son.

It's amazing how much time you can find when you don't spend it sitting in front of an idiot box.