01 March 2017

Politics, History & Blogging

This is the view looking toward my home, from about 2 miles north of where I live.
While other history related blogs like to pretend to be "objective" and apolitical, I make no such pretense here. I never have. I actually WANT readers to know my worldview and the prism through which I view events and history. I want to be transparent. I'm not a historian. I'm a writer who writes about history. Yes, I believe there is a distinction. 

Yet some of my critics like to suggest that I'm hypocritical because I criticize other history related blogs who show their biases and push an agenda. But there is a big difference between someone like me who openly and unabashedly reveals his worldview, and those who claim to be "objective" and apolitical, yet at the same time use their blogs and writing to do the same thing I often do here; but from a much different perspective. In doing so, they are attempting to put their political agenda and biases above any criticism. They are hiding behind their faux objectivity. I find that not only dishonest, but cowardly as well.

My header notes that I'm a "Southern" writer. I write from a Southerner's perspective. It's not the "only" Southern perspective, but it is a valid one based on my sense of place, my experiences growing up, my reading and study and the culture that has nurtured me for all of my 59 years. In the footer of my blog I quote Alphonse Vinh to give further insight into my perspectives and worldview:
From Virginia sprung the Southern Mind, a mind which favoured the local community, Burkean conservatism, the folkways of ancestors, an unwavering orthodox Christian faith. ~ Alphonse Vinh
I've read thousands of pages of history, biography and political philosophy focusing on the American South yet I've never come across a statement that better encapsulates my worldview than Mr. Vinh's. His statement reveals, very succinctly, my "biases" and the experiences and perspective from which I think and write. I make no apologies. In fact, I consider myself blessed to have lived these experiences. 

5 comments:

Jubilo said...

Dear Old Dom.,

Interesting ! Most Americans have always been on the move but as opposed to living in today's "global village," your declaration rings true.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Hello David. Actually, I believe Americans tended to "settle-down" from the 1880's up until the 1970's. I think this is especially true (with some demographic exceptions) for the South. Of course, I'm influenced by my own family's experiences with much of family being in Virginia since Jamestown. Even today, 5 out of my 6 children all live within 20 miles of me. I was an anti-globalist long before it was cool.

Best
RGW

jcrwilderness said...

Glad to see the whole world has not gone crazy. Appreciate these values and common sense. I am curious, Richard, if you see this as a result of our growing urbanization and losing some common values more prevalent in small town or rural America.

jcrwilderness said...

Dear Richard,

I wonder if a lot of the political divide and the other issues you have commented about (academia) is a result of our growing urbanization. Do you perceive we have lost that small town feel of more rural America as we cluster in cities? It seems to me we have become two separate nations in some ways, which is interesting as it mirrors some of the late 19th century issues.

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Yes, I do. I believe that the closer one is to one's sustenance (the soil), the more that person comes to be in touch with reality and what T.S. Eliot referred to as "the permanent things."

Thanks for reading.

Best
RGW