01 May 2017

Relic Hunting Post #151 - Liberty in the Shenandoah Valley

I've recently received permission to explore and metal detect several very historic homesites here in the Shenandoah Valley. On one recent quick survey excursion to one of these sites, I was able to make several interesting discoveries. Below is one of them. It's an 1820 Coronet Head Liberty Large Cent. These American copper coins were minted from 1816 to 1839. When I first recovered it, detail was rather sparse and I could not make out a date through the incrustation that had accumulated through the years it had been in the ground. So I boiled it in some hydrogen peroxide and gently worked it with a soft toothbrush. I then applied some coconut oil and Renaissance wax. She finally came to life and revealed her secrets. The site actually predates the mint of the coin. I hope to do a lot of exploration of this site and write a detailed history of the home and its inhabitants at some point in the future.


5 comments:

Steve Crammer said...

Interesting, that in 1820 that coin proclaiming Liberty only applied to a certain population in the Shenandoah Valley, not everyone...

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Steve - yes, that's true, but true for the whole country, not just the Shenandoah Valley.

Jine said...

I wonder how many of those coins proclaiming Liberty were in the pockets and coffers of the approximately 260,000 free blacks in the South, whose property was valued at an estimated $25 million.

Those figures come from the non-partisan, New Jerseyan, prominent Rev War historian Thomas Fleming, whose 2013 book A Disease In The Public Mind should be read by every American who seeks to understand the suppressed and buried "rest of the story".

"Truth crushed to earth will rise again...Truth forever on the scaffold, wrong forever on the throne" Martin Luther King, Jr., 14 March 1968

Richard G. Williams, Jr. said...

Frankly, I'm not quite sure what Steve's comment has to do with a post about a 200 year old coin but, whatever. Coincidentally, I ordered Fleming's book last week. I've been aware of it since it was published, but just decided to read it; primarily due to the fact that many court historians have trashed it. LOL.

Jine said...

I think you're going to love it, and also think it's one of the most important books to be written in this century thus far.